Low-Stakes Writing: 4 Reasons This Practice Makes Your Students Better Writers

It’s that time of the year when most ELA teachers are looking to get serious about writing instruction. Maybe this is point where you start thinking about assigning a capstone-like writing project. And in the coming months you plan to block out a significant portion of your calendar to get your students ready.

But your beginning to feel a creeping anxiety as the time approaches. You remember all the missteps the students have taken in recent years. And though you have improved your writing instruction over time, the progress your students have made really hasn’t been as quick or as transformative as you had hoped. Continue reading “Low-Stakes Writing: 4 Reasons This Practice Makes Your Students Better Writers”

4 Ways To Beat the Cheat

“This paper doesn’t read like his other writing. It’s good. A little too good.”

If you have read student writing long enough, occasionally you come across a student who takes a big step up in skill and content. When this happens with my students, the first thing I do is search key phrases on Google. Usually, within minutes, I find the website they plagiarized. But on some occasions, I am stumped.

I know their writing, and I know this piece they turned in is not theirs. But the Google machine isn’t finding it no matter how hard I try.

Then I start to wonder.

Continue reading “4 Ways To Beat the Cheat”

Make Them Process It

Let me introduce you to your step-by-step guide to get your students to write more while you grade less.

MTPI Uncover New value no TG

Founded on the Writer’s Notebook practice introduced in Kelly Gallagher’s Teaching Adolescent Writers and Aimee Buckner’s Notebook Know How, and drawing on over decade of teaching experience, I present a convenient way to set up and run the Writer’s Notebook in the secondary classroom.


To start, you will find tips about how to:

  • Prompt student writing,
  • Coach students to generate their own topics, and
  • Create ways to keep writing fresh for the entire school year.

But more than just providing a teacher’s guide for prompting students to fill a notebook with first-draft writing, you will walk through a step-by-step guide to help students:

  • Plan for revision,
  • Compose markedly improved second drafts,
  • Host conversations about their improved writing,
  • Add style to their writing through grammar instruction, and
  • Master the mental moves necessary to produce better drafts.

Out of Jeffery’s failures and successes over the past 13 years, he has put together a straightforward, “no nonsense” approach to teaching writing with The Writer’s Notebook.


Teaching Revision: The One Change You Need to Make Right Away

My students used to scoff, sneer, or ignore my efforts to make them revise their writing. And almost every one of my attempts at getting students to take a second look at their own writing usually ended in discouragement.

For me, not too long ago, lightening struck. I made a change. I started to get my students to approach revision in a fresh way, and their attitudes completely changed. They spent real, invested time making their writing better. They stopped complaining about revision. And, wouldn’t you know it, their drafts got better. Many students even started inquiring, on their own, how to adjust their first draft writing to avoid making their usual first draft mistakes.

What did I do? The answer was surprisingly simple. Actually, anyone can do it. And it only requires a little extra energy to make it happen in your classroom. All you have to do is change one little thing and prepare for dramatic results. Continue reading “Teaching Revision: The One Change You Need to Make Right Away”

3 Rules and Guidelines for the Writer’s Notebook

The centerpiece of writing instruction in my classroom is the Writer’s Notebook. And that begins with the students getting a composition book at the store at the start of the school year.

More specifically, I make them get a 100 page composition book. Not 70, not 80. 100. Since I have the students do a lot of writing, and a fairly decent amount of writing about writing, they need quite a bit of space for their words. I also want them to feel comfortable with all of the composing they will be doing, so I make sure to tell them to get wide-ruled–college-ruled is too tight, and doesn’t allow room for students to take notes in planning their revisions.

I also make sure that the Writer’s Notebook stays simple. One of the key features of the the notebook is that the writing is low-stakes. I will never put pressure on my students to write according to a rubric or scoring guide. They just need to write. Thus, I only give them 3 rules and guidelines. Continue reading “3 Rules and Guidelines for the Writer’s Notebook”

3 Reasons to Get the FREE Preview of My Book, Right Now

I couldn’t wait. Make Them Process It isn’t done yet. I still have to send it to an editor, but I just couldn’t hold back any longer. I want you to see what’s in there. There is some really good, practical stuff I want to get into your hands before the full release of the book. Consider it a back to school gift!

All summer long I have been putting my energy into writing a book that solves many challenges inevitably come with writing instruction:

  • Getting students to generate their own writing topics
  • Teaching grammar using a method that really sticks
  • Taking students beyond surface-level revision
  • Assessing multiple student drafts lightning quick
  • Developing a mature voice in young writers and
  • Celebrating the quality work students are completing in your classroom

I know many teachers who are looking for ways to streamline their writing instruction into a unified whole. They want to take all those discrete skills and put them all together in one place. I’m not going to say that Make Them Process It is the final answer, but it is at least several steps in that direction.

Here are 3 reasons why you should download this free preview, right now.

1. It is flexible and accommodatingMake Them Process It is not curriculum or a list of assignments. Instead, it is a how-to guide for getting maximum power out of a student composition book. Rather than disrupt your carefully planned instruction, I want to use this book as a way to come alongside you and offer support ongoing.

As you are thinking through how to deliver highly effective writing lessons, Make Them Process It can help you consider your academic year as whole, get your students to generate a lot more writing, teach your students how to revise their work at a deeper level, and help them integrate those grammar and craft lessons into their writing.

Please, keep doing what you’re doing. I don’t want you to change your lesson plans. But let Make Them Process It help you figure out how to organize everything that’s good about your teaching to uncover value in ways you have yet to consider.

2. You get ongoing support. I don’t like the idea of creating a product, convincing people to buy it, thanking the customers for their purchase, and then walking away. That doesn’t sit well with me.

Instead, I want to hear from you. I want to help you figure out how to make the teaching of writing effective and engaging for you and your students. I don’t want you to buy my book and then disappear into your classroom. I want to hear about your struggles and offer help where I can.

In 2007, I first heard about the Writer’s Notebook in a keynote address from Kelly Gallagher. I was convinced! I got started with the notebook right away, but shortly after launch, it fell out of use. I did this a few more times, eventually walking away. It took another keynote address from Kelly Gallagher several years later, with him still holding up that notebook, for me to give it another try. But this time, I was determined–I was going to get students to fill up that notebook!

And I did it too. I got through that year; it was hard. I wanted to quit more than once. I got confused, discouraged, and stuck. Several times I wanted to cry out for help, but I didn’t know who, if anyone, was listening. So, I soldiered on, made it through, and it turned out to be a rewarding experience. But if I had support at the time I needed it, I am convinced I could have taken all my efforts even further.

That’s what I want to give you. Even if you’re a pro writing teacher, I am convinced I have new value to offer you in Make Them Process It. And if your taking the plunge for the first time and need to call out for help at key moments, you should have someone there to walk with you. I’m here.

3. It won’t be free for long. In a few short weeks, the full version of Make Them Process It will be ready for release and this offer might be off the table. I don’t want you to miss out.

Pick up your free preview of the book after taking a brief survey. This is the only thing I am going ask from you in taking me up on this offer: five minutes of your time. When you click “submit” at the end of the survey, you will get access to the preview copy of the book. Take the survey and claim your free preview copy of Make Them Master It, right now!


Share this offer with others who are looking for these solutions. Click on the social media buttons below to tell your friends.

Stick around for a discussion too: What is your #1 single biggest challenge in getting your students to integrate your lessons into their writing assignments? Answer in the comment section below.

Getting Students Beyond Superficial Revision

You’re about to get into today’s lesson: revising a first draft. Before you say the words, you can feel the collective groan gathering strength. When you finally come out with it, they are ready to revolt: “Today we’re going to revise your writing assignment!” And there it is.

They complain. They grunt violently. They look for pitchforks and other pointy objects to take up against you. And one student in the corner quietly Snapchats a selfie of an ice bag on her head. It’s clear. They don’t want to do this.

As I see it, a big problem is students think they are done with their writing. In the eyes of each student writer, what they put on paper looks “good enough.” They are done. If they understand it, then there’s nothing to revise. But even when I get them to see that their writing needs further work, all I get from them are superficial changes. They may change a punctuation mark or two and a grammar mistake, but they almost never revise for content and purpose.

Sound familiar?  Continue reading “Getting Students Beyond Superficial Revision”