How We Love Our Students

I would like to think that I am one of the good ones. I think that I understand my students.

In the first few days of my course, I tell students that they . . .

  • can come to me if they need an extension on an assignment, ask, and I will grant it,
  • can make up a quiz or an assignment as many times as they need to get the score they want,
  • can request time to make up a quiz or a test if they missed it, and I’ll be there.

I often talk about how certain times of the year create more pressure points for students who are committed to several activities.

I think that I am such a good person when I show the depth of my understanding like this. What a great and empathetic teacher!

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I Don’t Have a Clue

It turns out, I was nowhere close to being that caring teacher. I’ll admit, I didn’t have much empathy for my students. Sometimes, yes. But most of the time, no. Continue reading “How We Love Our Students”

7 Reasons to Build a Tribe of Peer Coaches

In Monday’s post I suggested that one of best paths to professional growth is through partnering with another teacher. This has been true for me. I have partnered with many great teachers over the years. Some collaborations centered on a brief project. Other helping mutual helping relationships have been ongoing for a decade or more. All of these interactions have been peer-to-peer, and each one of us has coached the other at one point.

If you haven’t thought recently about how you might increase your tribe of peer coaches, here are 7 reasons I have found to make this a top priority toward professional growth.  Continue reading “7 Reasons to Build a Tribe of Peer Coaches”