School’s Out: Closing the Book on My Thirteenth Year of Teaching

It’s been a while since I have posted. The last time I wrote for Make Them Master It, I was beginning to explore what it would look like to ditch the grade book and go gradeless in the classroom. I was excited to post about what I was learning and get the conversation going here. But then something got in the way: grading essays.

So, the growing education trend I was getting really excited about (going gradeless in the classroom) had to wait until I was done . . . grading? And the assessment that I set myself up for during that time was intense! For catharsis at the time, I even used the Twitter hashtag #AmGrading.

But it was rewarding. More on that some other time. Continue reading “School’s Out: Closing the Book on My Thirteenth Year of Teaching”

3 FREE Tools to Make Writing Assessment Meaningful

Some time ago, I did a few posts (here, here and here) on tools I use for online grading. Since I am in the middle of assessing a big student paper, I thought I would shoot a quick video of how I use in writing assessment.

The three tools are . . .

Continue reading “3 FREE Tools to Make Writing Assessment Meaningful”

How We Love Our Students

I would like to think that I am one of the good ones. I think that I understand my students.

In the first few days of my course, I tell students that they . . .

  • can come to me if they need an extension on an assignment, ask, and I will grant it,
  • can make up a quiz or an assignment as many times as they need to get the score they want,
  • can request time to make up a quiz or a test if they missed it, and I’ll be there.

I often talk about how certain times of the year create more pressure points for students who are committed to several activities.

I think that I am such a good person when I show the depth of my understanding like this. What a great and empathetic teacher!

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I Don’t Have a Clue

It turns out, I was nowhere close to being that caring teacher. I’ll admit, I didn’t have much empathy for my students. Sometimes, yes. But most of the time, no. Continue reading “How We Love Our Students”

What’s the 1 Thing You Can Do To Make Your Students Better Writers?

For the first ten years of my career, this was a question I wrestled with constantly. I purchased my fair share of books and attended more than a few workshops in search of the answer. I DID find it, but I didn’t realize it at the time. Then I kept looking.

The answer came in my third year on the job: Make them write more. That’s it! Make them write everyday. Make them write at the start of a lesson. Make them write at the end of a lesson. Make them write for homework. Write. Write. Write.

How? There are a lot of ways a teacher can do this. For me, the answer came in the form of The Writer’s Notebook.

MTPI Cover Compbook TG (1)

In year three, I gave it a try. And I failed. Several times actually. And because I couldn’t make it work on those trials, I decided to give up and moved on.

But now I’m back! And I am even more convinced that this is the best tool in a writing teacher’s equipment bag.

Continue reading “What’s the 1 Thing You Can Do To Make Your Students Better Writers?”

For a Goal to Matter, It Has to Stretch Us

My story with goal-setting is one of hits and misses. Mostly misses. I set goals that are too big reach in the time frame I set, or they are out of sync with all the roles I play in my day-to-day life.

But this past year I have had a small taste of success in setting a couple of goals and achieving them. It felt great! When I achieved them, it felt as if that part of my year was a little more meaningful. Afterward, I had a strange new experience with goal-setting: I wanted more. Around that time New York Times best selling author, Michael Hyatt published this book:

Ybye-book1 Continue reading “For a Goal to Matter, It Has to Stretch Us”