Public Speaking: 10 Video Presentation Don’ts

These days, tech is cheap, and getting cheaper. Things we couldn’t do just a few years ago are not only possible today, but we have gone even farther. For instance, sending a video message to a friend. Now, with the tap of a screen, we can create a short video, then tap the screen again and it is off to its destination.

Technology has enhanced my instruction, especially when it comes to public speaking. I am fortunate enough to teach in a school where just about every student has access to mobile technology that can shoot, store, and ship video through the internet. I have turned more and more to the use of video for instruction, practice, and evaluation of public speaking. If a student gives speech, and no one is around to record it, then your evaluation of what happened is can be questioned. But when it’s recorded, the student can see for him- or herself what was good and what needs improvement.

As I have asked students to submit more video presentations, I have developed a list of don’ts. These are elements of filming that students unintentionally let into their videos. They distract the audience from the message the student is intending to deliver.  Continue reading “Public Speaking: 10 Video Presentation Don’ts”

Public Speaking: 3 Reasons to Stop Your Students from Using Visual Aids Immediately

When I first started assigning presentations in my classroom, that was all I did: Assign them. The students were given some guidelines, but they were essentially left on their own to figure out how to plan and perform their presentations. And for most of my students that meant creating a PowerPoint that had every word they were going to say scripted on each slide because their plan was to read it to the class while facing the screen, sheepishly looking over their shoulder every once in awhile to see if they still need to keep going.

Presentations in my class used to be so painful. I’m not just talking about me. It was painful for the students too. They didn’t like preparing for them, didn’t like delivering them, and didn’t like being in the audience. But I have learned a trick that makes the presentations so much better.  Continue reading “Public Speaking: 3 Reasons to Stop Your Students from Using Visual Aids Immediately”

Presentations: How Two Sources Transformed Public Speaking in My Classroom

How has your experience been with assigning presentations in your classroom? Inspiring? Fun? Or does it sound more like how mine use to? Before I made significant changes, my students would make PowerPointⓇ presentations that had far too much content on each slide. Then they would stand up in front of the class, and face the projected image and present to it. Then when they were done we would all clap.

If your classroom presentations look like that, then it’s time for you to say “Enough!” I am still in the middle of learning how to teach my students to be better oral communicators, so you won’t see anything magical in my classroom, but you will see confident students, facing the class, note cards in hand, transitioning from topic to topic, with pertinent visuals on their slides. They have impressed me in ways I never thought possible under my instruction. I used to think that it was the job of another more competent teacher to get students ready for public speaking. But I have found that anyone can do it.  Continue reading “Presentations: How Two Sources Transformed Public Speaking in My Classroom”

How 1 Substitute Teacher Can Make You a Better Instructor

In my experience, making a small shift in thinking can make a big difference. For example, I assign outside reading to my students. They choose a novel, they read it, then they do a brief write up. The goal of the assignment is to get students to try reading different new books and see that maybe they could enjoy this wonderful pastime.. Alas, many of my students are lazy and wait until the last minute, which means they cheat. I have found that if I take them to the school library every two weeks and make them publicly sign up for their book title four weeks in advance of the due date, they do a lot more reading on their own. There. Two small changes made a big difference.

As an English teacher, there are many practices I have in the classroom that are efficiency and productivity killers. I have caught myself committing a fair share of these over the years, but I know there are many more that I have missed. I wish there was a way to catch them, like a having a fellow teacher observe me. Not an administrator, not a site coach, but a peer whom I trust. The problem is that person would most likely be teaching at the same time I would be. Can this dilemma be solved?  Continue reading “How 1 Substitute Teacher Can Make You a Better Instructor”

7 Reasons to Build a Tribe of Peer Coaches

In Monday’s post I suggested that one of best paths to professional growth is through partnering with another teacher. This has been true for me. I have partnered with many great teachers over the years. Some collaborations centered on a brief project. Other helping mutual helping relationships have been ongoing for a decade or more. All of these interactions have been peer-to-peer, and each one of us has coached the other at one point.

If you haven’t thought recently about how you might increase your tribe of peer coaches, here are 7 reasons I have found to make this a top priority toward professional growth.  Continue reading “7 Reasons to Build a Tribe of Peer Coaches”

Professional Development: Are You Waiting on Your District?

When I first entered the teaching, I was awash in professional development. It seemed like there was no shortage of money to request training either. Then the housing market crashed, the cash flow slowed to a trickle, and professional development was scaled far, far back. My state’s governor at the time lifted the professional development hours requirement in order to maintain keep one’s credential cleared. And poof, it was pretty much gone.

If I was going to sit and wait for my district to bring the learning to me, then I was going to do quite a bit of waiting. That wasn’t going to be good for me. It definitely wouldn’t be good for my students. What’s a teacher to do?  Continue reading “Professional Development: Are You Waiting on Your District?”

Whatever It Takes – Give Me A Break!

If you have been reading through the week, we have been exploring a quote I read in a book for educators. It goes, “Whatever it takes–that’s the job of the teacher.” At the start of the week, we accepted that challenge. But now that we’re at the end of the week, I have to say that these kind of statements just make me mad.

I challenged the students with this on Thursday. Now I have a challenge for those educators who have moved on from the classroom because in my experience, they are the ones delivering these calls to action.

I know your intentions are good, and you are there for student success. I just want you to know that it has the potential to come across as critical and sometimes undeserved. All I really want to say is that it is very difficult to sit in a seminar, or a faculty meeting, and hear a former classroom teacher challenge all those who are still in the classroom with, “Are you doing whatever it takes?”  Continue reading “Whatever It Takes – Give Me A Break!”