Lost in the Push for Literacy? 6 Reasons to Read THESE 6 THINGS

I recently finished reading an incredible book by Michigan teacher, Dave Stuart Jr. It was one of those reads that felt like a mixture between a vacation and conference. There were refreshing and affirming words of encouragement, but there were also mighty challenges put forth.

The title of the book is These 6 Things: How to Focus Your Teaching on What Matters Most. I have read books that boast they have the most important ideas for teaching, and usually they meant that the reader would have to buy into some sort of system that would be a complete overhaul and redesign of his or her classroom. No thanks, and this is not what These 6 Things is about. At. All.

Come along and I will show you six reasons why every secondary teacher, regardless of what content area he or she teaches, should read this book.
Continue reading “Lost in the Push for Literacy? 6 Reasons to Read THESE 6 THINGS”

This Tiny Change Had a Big Impact

When it comes to New Year’s Resolutions, I never win. Well, except for the last New Year’s Resolution I ever made, which was “Resolved: I will NEVER make another New Year’s Resolution for the rest of my life.” So far, I have been holding to that one flawlessly!

But why am I talking about the New Year? For us teachers, it might as well be the new year. And it is the time when many of us take our reflections from the previous school year, the wins and loses, and decide what we want to tweak, add, throw out, or change (or, as I teach my students how to revise their writing: Replace, Add, Delete, and Reorder).

Last year I made one tiny change to my day-to-day, and was able to do it all year long. Every. Day. It pushed me and challenged me. It has shown me that I really can set goals for self-improvement and make real changes, really! The thing is, the goal I set is kind of stupid. I’m almost embarrassed enough to not talk about it at all. I thought it was so silly when I decided to do it, I did NOT share it with anyone. I kept it to myself. But it was such a success, I think I want to share it. Just promise not to judge me. Continue reading “This Tiny Change Had a Big Impact”

4 Signs Your Development as a Teacher May Be Delayed

Yep. That’s me. Coming from behind. The Professional Development (PD) that I have been offered over the course of my career has been marked by a few hits and many misses. I would like to blame the principal, the site, the district, lawmakers, or anyone but me. In fact, I used to blame them. A lot.

Overtime I began to see that the my lack of development wasn’t my school’s or district’s problem, it was something that I needed to take ownership for. I was an adult who knew how to do learning on his own. But there’s good news! Things are better, and I’m getting caught up. And there has never been a better time for a teacher like me to get answers to the burning questions they have.

Continue reading “4 Signs Your Development as a Teacher May Be Delayed”

How We Love Our Students

I would like to think that I am one of the good ones. I think that I understand my students.

In the first few days of my course, I tell students that they . . .

  • can come to me if they need an extension on an assignment, ask, and I will grant it,
  • can make up a quiz or an assignment as many times as they need to get the score they want,
  • can request time to make up a quiz or a test if they missed it, and I’ll be there.

I often talk about how certain times of the year create more pressure points for students who are committed to several activities.

I think that I am such a good person when I show the depth of my understanding like this. What a great and empathetic teacher!

05198b01f5b101580673c1afe78cbb1b0f76d7-wm.jpg

I Don’t Have a Clue

It turns out, I was nowhere close to being that caring teacher. I’ll admit, I didn’t have much empathy for my students. Sometimes, yes. But most of the time, no. Continue reading “How We Love Our Students”

English Teacher Math

Here’s a pic showing how I convert a 6×6 rubric:

20180113_155752127200643.jpg

It makes sense if you don’t think about it.

To me, grading is maddening. Trying to take Language Arts, turn it into a number, and then that number turns into a letter. That letter, to certain degree, presents which opportunities are available to my students and which ones aren’t.

How do you handle grades?