“Don’t You Trust Me?” with Nancy Erwin — Episode 2

 

 

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Dear Teacher, 

When it comes to what you believe is the in the best interest of the students enrolled in your class, have you ever asked this question: “Don’t you trust me?”

Nancy ErwinIn today’s episode of Dear Teacher, Don’t Give Up! we are going to hear Nancy Erwin’s story about the first few years of her teaching career. As a first grade teacher, when her district made Nancy and her colleagues administer assessment after assessment (which included a lot of hand scoring), she wondered if this is really all there was to teaching, or if there was something more.

At one point, she stepped away from the classroom, and Nancy took the time to reflect, “Should I keep going?”

Hear the rest of Nancy’s story HERE.


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More Encouragement, Less Judgment

One thing that always seems to surprise young teachers when they are starting out is just how much time they give to the work. It’s tough. Being a teacher requires grit, the capability to hang in there and stick to it. And the less experience one has on the job, the more time, thought, and energy must go into the effort of preparing and delivering quality instruction.

When I entered the profession, the implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act was in full swing. That meant there were student proficiency targets, and if schools, departments, and teachers weren’t achieving those targets, something was wrong and some aspect(s) of what you were doing in the classroom was going to go through an uncomfortable change. Teaching without these extra layers of accountability is already dynamic and complex enough as it is, so you can imagine that those early years for me involved long nights of reflecting, assessing student work, and planning instruction. Continue reading “More Encouragement, Less Judgment”